The Power of Knowing Your Path

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Recently I have switched from looking at my work as a voice specialist from something I do for fun to someone whom I deeply and passionately identify with. What I have discovered by doing so is that I have much more clarity as to what I want for my career as well as for my clients, what prioritized actions I need to take to get where it is I ultimately want to go, the best path to travel while journeying toward my destination, and how I can sustain myself physically and emotionally along the way.

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The first step was for me to come to terms with my reluctance to claim my place in this world as a voice specialist. By telling myself I was merely having fun and uncommitted to any particular outcome, I was holding myself back from moving forward. It was as if I was afraid to succeed at something which, if I really was honest, I wanted very much. I think this was because I had built a story for myself around the fact that I didn’t feel particularly qualified, even though I had years of experience, education, and personal success as an actor, teacher, and vocalist.

Second, I also became aware that I’d constructed a story in which I told myself that I’d be sacrificing too much of my energy, time, and psychic space in dedicating myself to this new career push.  It didn’t take me long to understand that neither story I told myself was true, but that this new attitude was actually bringing me more joy than I’d experienced before changing my mindset. So what was working for me this time that hadn’t before?

1.     I was extremely clear as to what I was willing to sacrifice in order to commit myself to my dream job.

2.     I also did a full personal inventory as to what my limitations actually were, as well as my capabilities and talents as a vocal performance coach.

3.     I divided my journey into mini trips with sustainable rewards along the way.

4.     At each mini goal I reassessed my action plan and modified it as needed.

5.     I kept my expectations encouraging rather than overwhelming, and let them be reflected in my action plan.

6.     I did not travel alone. I had several close friends who held “my hands” along the way.

7.     I consistently utilized the affirmations which worked best for me.

8.     I made sure my self-talk was positive and motivating.

9.     I worked hard to take time to smell the roses along the way by reminding myself daily that I’m only as successful as my self-care.

My biggest project to date is filming a series of virtual workshops to be available on my website as early as June of this year ( www.expressivevoicedynamics.com ). I’m excited to offer those interested in expanding and deepening their powers of vocal expression through this classes, as well as through my books, Soul of Voice and Soul of My Voice, available on www.amazon.com  in either e-book or print formats.

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Gwen Overland